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Abstract - Bacteriological Analysis of Ready- to- serve Foods from a South Indian City: A Potential Source for Drug Resistant Pathogens
Aruna Siddabathuni

Bacteriological Analysis of Ready- to- serve Foods from a South Indian City: A Potential Source for Drug Resistant Pathogens

Aruna Siddabathuni

Department of Microbiology, GSL Medical College and General Hospital, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India

 

ABSTRACT

Objective: Street foods are well - known source for bacteriological contamination with pathogens, responsible for health hazards like food poisoning and diarrheal diseases. The present study was undertaken to analyze the bacteriological quality of ready - to - serve foods vended in the streets of Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Method: This cross-sectional study over a 6-month period tested 142 diverse locally sold street foods collected from different locations in Rajahmundry city. Isolates obtained were identified to the species level and antibiotic susceptibility patterns determined. Additional information regarding food preparation, storage and handling practices observed by vendors was noted to correlate with the extent of bacterial contamination.

Results: Majority (71.12%) of the ready to eat foods were contaminated with bacteria. Samosa (24%) and panipuri (22%) showed higher bacterial contamination rates. Of the total 177 strains recovered from all street foods, Escherichia coli (44%) and Staphylococcus aureus (29%) were the major isolates. Staphylococcus aureus (23%) was predominantly isolated from panipuri samples; Proteus species (29%) from masala chat; E. coli (31%) from Samosa; Klebsiella pneumoniae (40%) from Samosa; Pseudomonas aeruginosa (40%) from panipuri. Higher degrees of bacterial contamination were associated with poor personnel hygiene of vendors and unsafe food handling practices. Among the isolates, 33% of E. coli were extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producers while 15% were Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Conclusions: Corrective measures like provision of health education to vendors and strict regulations for implementation of good hygienic practices would improve street foods quality.  J Microbiol Infect Dis 2019; 9(2):83-89.

Keywords: Bacterial contamination, Street foods, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Volume 09, Number 02 (2019)